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Solve Squirrel Frustrations with Sawmill Gravy (Hunting Tactics & Recipe)

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December 4, 2015
Published in News & Tips > Hunting > Small Game
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It’s cold. A heavy frost rests solidly on the ground, covering every leaf with a crunchy film that even a mouse couldn’t tread across quietly. Deer season is in the heat of the rut and you’ve left your favorite spot alone for seven straight days waiting for the right wind. Anticipation is running high; you know that at any minute the ol’ heavy-horned super chief could walk by your hunting treestand.

And then you hear it—a rustling so unmistakable that you slip the mitt off your hand and pull your gun to the ready. Holding your breath, you turn slowly.  You catch movement with the corner of your eye and the hair on your neck stands straight up.

Taking one last slow breath before the inevitable, you shift your body, fully facing the commotion. You spot him instantly…digging nuts from the forest floor.

How many times a season does this happen? And when you do take the time to go out and shoot a few squirrels, where do they go?

Bushytail Tactics

Hunting squirrels, like deer, has a lot to do with patience. With .22 long rifle in hand, find a heavily populated spot, sit against a tree and wait. Eventually they’ll show when everything becomes quiet and still.

If deer season has you tired of parking your rear against a tree there are other options. Grab a buddy and walk slowly through prime habitat. Keep your eyes peeled for movement on the ground and in the trees.

When a squirrel can’t find a hole in the trunk or retreat to its nest, it will often hug the tree toward the top. Find a good rest while your companion goes to the other side and “walks ‘em back ‘round the tree.” When the squirrel shuffles back your way, take your time and squeeze the trigger. Rarely will a “treed” squirrel jump ship and scramble through the limbs with this approach.

1 arrow point How to Skin Squirrels: Step by Step Picture Guide


Squirrel Tree Resized

Fried Squirrel and Sawmill Gravy

Ingredients:

  • 2 or more squirrels
  • Flour
  • Milk
  • Salt and Pepper
  • Cayenne Pepper
  • Honey
  • Vegetable Oil

1. After cleaning your squirrels and washing them thoroughly, quarter them (there’s not much meat on the ribs).

2. Dust the meat with a little salt and pepper, and then a healthy amount of cayenne pepper and honey, giving it a sweet and spicy taste.

3. In a zip-lock bag, mix in flour (enough to coat all the meat), salt and pepper and add the quartered squirrel, shaking vigorously until all the meat is sufficiently covered.

4. Meanwhile, heat enough oil in a ten-inch cast-iron skillet so that it comes about an inch up the side of the pan. When it’s popping hot, add as much of the meat as you can so that they’re not touching.

5. Fry for about three minutes on each side on medium heat, then remove to a paper towel.

6. Turn down the heat and remove some of the oil from the pan, leaving just enough to coat the bottom and dredge in some flour, about half a cup.

7. Once the flour and oil become happily married, slowly add the milk – the amount you add depends on your preferred consistency.

8. Drop in a pinch of salt, a healthy dose of black pepper, the cooked squirrel and let simmer for a few minutes.

I prefer to serve biscuits with this dish, but cornbread goes nicely as well. You could also pair it with some wild rice and if you’re so inclined, a bed of turnip greens. Bon appétit!

1 arrow pointTIP: 5 Easy Squirrel Recipes - LINK

 

Tagged under Read 2842 times Last modified on August 30, 2017
Josh Wolfe
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Josh Wolfe is a freelance writer and photographer and the editor and publisher of The Golf Sport magazine. A graduate of Auburn University (B.A. English) and the Savannah College of Art and Design (M.A. Photography), he got his start in the outdoor industry first as a columnist with Outdoor Hub, which he maintains today, and later as an associate editor with Sporting Classics magazine and the editor of its online publication, Sporting Classics Daily. He lives on a farm just outside of Lynchburg, Tennessee, and won’t hesitate to tell you Jack Daniel’s is most effectively consumed neat.

See more of his work at www.joshwolfeoutdoors.com and www.golfsportmag.com.

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  • I've been waiting 50 years to go squirrel hunting and I finally got to go with a friend this past fall. Boy was it a blast. We only had one day when we were in the squirrels and I got my limit. Got home and made a stew as I had no knowledge of anything else to do with them. Really want to try this recipe with grays. Where I live now we only have little reds. Thanks.