Advanced Search +

MY NEWS & TIPS

A soil test is easy to do and costs about as much as a happy meal at McDonalds. Here's how you do it. What You Need to Test Clean plastic pail, plastic bag or anything that holds dirt Garden spade, putty knife or a soil auger (pictured at right) Soil sample bag Gather the Sample Dig a few inches into the dirt (below the sod line); Deposit 1/4 cup or so of dirt into pail or bag; Walk around (and through) your plot gathering up samples of the dirt — at least a half dozen or more 1/4 cup samples;…
Read more
In case you haven't noticed, deer hunters are turning into farmers. Every year more and more deer hunters are planting food plots to supplement the natural food sources used by white-tailed deer. But they are skipping the most important part of planting food plots — the part no farmer would ever skip. Knowing their soil. Think a like a farmer — get to know your food plot soil by testing it. Farmers know their soil. They know which ground to plant early and which to plant late. They know what to run in dry ground and where their plants will have…
Read more
If you've done everything you can to save your food plot from failing after spring planting, here are the seven steps you'll need to take to get back on track. Step #1 — Diagnose cause of failure. Food plots fail for a variety of reasons, but most of them are weather related. Food plots can't live in a puddle of water and they can't live in a dust bowl either. Keep your eye on the weather and hope. That's about all you can do. Plant disease and insects can also wipe out a plot, as can too much competition by…
Read more
  If there is one thing that can ruin a great hunting season, it's food plot failure. You spent all spring planting food plots to compete with your neighborhood baiters and the farmers' corn fields, and now, two months before the opener, your plots have gone bad. If you want your food plot to look like this in the fall, you'll need to take precautionary measures.   Prevention is the Best Medicine By far, the easiest way to deal with a food plot failure is to prevent it all together. Taking some precautionary steps can nip failure in the bud.…
Read more
Page 1 of 8