Talk to enough bowhunters and you’ll eventually hear one sheepishly admit that, at one time or another, he or she has hunted from a treestand while not wearing a full-body safety harness. When that happens, you need to do that person a favor and set them straight.  Tell them there’s never a good enough reason for going up a tree without one. Of course, you’re probably not telling them anything they don’t already know, but it’s worth repeating. Bow hunting should be a safe and enjoyable pursuit. Wear a safety harness and keep it that way. A full-body safety harness…
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When it comes to hunter safety, learn it, preach it, and - most of all - practice it yourself, because it's easy to get overconfident and become careless. Always remain conscious of safety when you head to the woods.  Gun safety:1. Become familiar with your firearm. Know how to carry it, load it, unload it, and know what to expect when you pull the trigger.2. Always assume every gun is loaded and always point the muzzle in a safe direction. Never point your gun at or toward another person.3. Never put your finger on the trigger unless you intend to…
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In an instant the blue-sky, 70-degree, high-country afternoon morphed into a mother of an autumn storm. My husband and I jumped off our horses and secured them, threw our saddles adorned with all our gear into a pile, ripped the tent fly from its pouch, jumped atop the saddles and covered the human-plus-gear mound with the waterproof cover. Clouds generated wind, which delivered rain, which begot hail. We weathered the storm, which lasted into twilight, without getting drenched or frozen. The storm forced us to camp at an unplanned backcountry location. And, we had only a brief stretch of daylight…
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The rain ended an hour before daylight, but the ground and brightly-colored leaf litter covering the forest floor remained wet. Rain water dripping off of the tree limbs was beginning to slow its rhythm. A few vehicles already lined up in the trailhead parking lot, as others pulled in carrying autumn hikers. The family and I worked our way up the trail consisting of rock outcroppings; some of the trail was on exposed rock making for some slippery steps.   When hiking this fall, make sure your daypack contains essentials such as a flashlight, food and water, a handheld GPS…
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To make fall fishing comfortable, planning for the right cold weather gear will will make your trip a good. For anglers in the north, the arrival of fall means two things - cold temperatures and hot fishing. Banner days on the water are the norm, but to make these trips comfortable and safe, preplanning and ensuring certain items are in the boat will make your excursion a good one. Choosing Clothing for Fall Fishing Conditions can vary come fall and will often change by the hour so make sure you choose fishing clothes that keeps you warm and comfortable. Concentrate…
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    Steve Hall, executive director of the International Hunter Education Association – USA. Todd Sampsell, the Missouri state director for The Nature Conservancy. Plus, Todd Sampsell, the Missouri state director for The Nature Conservancy, also joins host Rob Keck. This week, Steve Hall, executive director of the International Hunter Education Association – USA is featured on Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World radio. In addition, listeners will hear how healthy grasslands and forests mean healthy water resources, too. The show will air Saturday, August 23 at 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. Eastern time on RURAL RADIO SiriusXM Channel 80. Hunter safety education…
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As the camper from the neighboring campsite approached, his facial expression revealed obvious concern. He introduced himself and we shook hands. Before I finished informing him of my name, he asked if I had seen anybody else but him at his campsite this morning. I had not, but then I don't make it a practice to be eyeballing others' campsites. Turns out, he was the victim of a campsite theft. He went for a hike early that morning and upon return, his high performance, and expensive ice cooler was gone. The two men, who occupied the campsite on the other…
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Did you know that historically, July has been by far the most dangerous month for boating accidents and fatalities? Last year was no different, with over 900 reported accidents during the month of July, primarily on the weekends, according to the United States Coast Guard 2013 Recreational Boating Statistics Report. What can we infer from this? Well, it's pretty simple actually. Boating activity increases during the summer months, and more activity equates to a higher chance of being involved in a boating accident. We want you to be safe, so you and your loved ones can stay safe this Independence…
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  The sight was chilling, to say the least. My tent and everything inside it had burned to the ground. Nothing was left but a pile of charred fabric and blackened gear. I had been gone only a few minutes. A friend and I were camping near a backcountry lake, and needing some water for dinner preparation, I grabbed a jug and headed to the shore to fill it. In the brief time I was away, the wind shifted and apparently blew embers on the too-close tent, which caught fire. I was only 100 or so yards away, but never…
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Graphic via U.S. Coast Guard Every boater on the water should be able to read and understand colored navigational aids. Knowing what these aids mean is very important to the safety of everyone on the water. According to the Boating Safety Resource Center, there were 651 deaths in 4,515 U.S. boating accidents in 2012. Another 3,000 were injured. Of those, 13 deaths and 236 injuries were caused by navigation rules violation. By understanding the basic markings of navigational aids in the waterway, boaters can make sure time on the water is fun as it should be. These green and red…
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