Arizona fishing pro Josh Bertrand is never happier than when he’s staring at his graph, working a dropshot rig in water at least as deep as his Nitro boat is long. In a perfect world, he’d be looking at ‘em in 40, 50 or even 60 feet of water, because that’s when many of his peers start to get a little nervous and think about giving up. There can’t possibly be a bass that deep, can there? Of course there are bass there, but sometimes they aren’t the tournament winners. On occasion, even a deep water freak, the Elite Series…
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Summer Froggin for Bass

Friday, July 24 2015 12:41 pm - for Bass
Bass busters throughout the land love the springtime bite. When bass start getting active. Pursuing eats and getting ready to reproduce. Great fun is had by most anglers in the spring. However, many non-fanatical anglers whine about the "Dog Days" of summer. Too much heat. Fishing isn't as easy, etc. That's just fine for the rest of us who can't wait for the heat and the weed-choked areas to form on our favorite lakes. For the uniformed, it's an impenetrable mass. But for those in the know, it's time to bust big bass with frogs in the shallows while others…
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Strike King pro Keith Combs loves to fish deep water for largemouth bass. This is especially true during the summer months. The three-time Toyota Texas Bass Classic champ and Bassmaster Elite Series pro decided to take a few minutes to share his Top 3 tactics for dredging largies from the depths. Deep cranking. "Generally my first instinct is to fish crankbaits on the deeper structure," said Combs. "The easiest way to locate the fish is to find points or channel bends. These are classic structures where bass usually live. "I like to fish crankbaits fast this time of the year…
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The simplest way to select a bass fishing rod is to match the rod's action with bait-specific techniques. We can narrow techniques down into 2 categories: tight-line techniques and slack-line techniques. The "action" of a fishing rod is determined by where the rod flexes along the blank. A rod with a"fast action" flexes mostly near the tip. A "moderate action" rod flexes towards the middle of the blank. "Slow action" rods flex near the butt section. Standard bass actions range from moderate to extra-fast. Tight-line Techniques These fishing techniques include fishing with crankbaits, jerbaits, spinnerbaits, and buzzbaits that are retrieved…
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1. A fishing trick to use in stained or muddy water or at night when bass can’t see as well is to use big lures that displace water and create good vibrations. 2. Another trick some fishermen use is to put a little more bend in the blade of a spinnerbait to make it throb more intensely and make more noise as it moves through the water. 3. Maybe the best trick I can give you, though, is to slow down your retrieve. Believe it or not, a slow moving bait will actually send out more heavy vibrations than a…
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Usually, when fishing fans think of Mercury pro Skeet Reese, they think of bright yellow and black, his signature colors. And maybe his Bassmaster Classic win, Angler of the Year (AOY) title and multiple wins at B.A.S.S.  Basically, he's thought of as a great angler. When it comes to pinning down Reese for a specific style of fishing, well, that's another thing entirely. He's won events flipping shallow with soft plastics, cranking, drop-shotting, tossing large swimbaits, essentially using whatever it takes to win. So when it comes to choosing his technique suggestions for summertime bass fishing, Reese has a large…
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Worms, crickets, and other live bait will always catch bluegill, but if you want to catch more bluegill, switch to jigs. Bug-like jigs are great lure imitations, and tiny is better than big. Tiny fishing jigs can be more easily fished at the sluggish pace that sunfish prefer. These featherweight jigs snag less and can tempt fish that may not be hungry enough to chomp a big bait. Also, enticing, erratic retrieves are possible with tiny offerings that can’t be duplicated with bigger jigs. When bluegill get picky, matching their diet with a jig imitation can bring more action. Also…
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When I think back about big bass I’ve caught, one thing comes to mind and that’s lure presentation. An erratic retrieve, in most cases, has produced many of my biggest bass. Why is that? Because this retrieve most closely mimics live forage. When danger threatens, they are going to do something different, like speed up, retreat, go crazy, play possum or try to hide. In most cases though, they will move out like a late freight train. Fishing lures such as plastic worms, jigs, spinnerbaits (slow-rolled), crankbaits (fished in a stop-and-go retrieve) and even topwater lures can be worked erratically…
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Learning to fly fish is no harder than any other kind of fishing if you start with the proper equipment. Fly lines range from 1 weight to a 12 weight. The larger the line number, the larger the line size and the larger the fly you can cast with it. Level lines are the same diameter throughout their length, and are fine for casting short distances but not delicate presentations. Double-taper lines taper at both ends, allow a more delicate presentation, and are best for short to medium cast. Weight-forward lines have larger diameters the first 30 feet. They cast…
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How to Find River Crappie

Sunday, May 10 2015 12:00 pm - for Crappie
Finding crappie in rivers can be a whole lot easier if you remember that crappie rarely challenge the main flow of a river. They prefer to use eddies, slack water, and cover that breaks the current. Speckled perch will spawn out of current in areas that warm more quickly than the main flow, with peak spawning at 66 to 70 degrees water temperature. Vertical cover that extends from the river bottom to above the surface provides good holding places for crappie in rivers with heavy current. The heavier the current the wider the cover must be to hold them. In…
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