Tips on how anglers can use sound to their advantage. Unlike humans, fish have two sensors for detecting sound: the inner ear and the lateral line. These two systems work independently of each other to hear and feel particle motion and pressure changes. The systems are able to correlate and send signals to various parts of the brain to initiate a reaction or function. Catfish receive top rating for both lateral-line detection and hearing strength, according to a survey of prominent fish physiologists and fisheries biologists. The sauger is also given an excellent rating for its lateral line, while walleye,…
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I do most of my crappie fishing in eastern Arkansas where clear waters are as rare as 5-pound crappie. I have no trouble catching crappie in the highly colored oxbow lakes I usually visit, but put me on a clear mountain reservoir, and I find it hard to get a nibble.   To be better prepared for my next clear-water experience, I consulted three experts on clear-water crappie fishing. I explained some problems I've encountered when fishing transparent water and asked how they catch fish in similar situations. The advice they offered should help any crappier score more consistently.  …
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Lure color is important when it comes to catching crappie. Sometimes, only one color will catch fish; other times several colors work. But sorry folks, there are no precise rules to follow.   Carry a wide variety of fishing lure colors in case the crappie aren't biting. You can try matching the fishing Lure to the color of the water. For example, lime or metallic green in greenish water, motor oil or yellow on yellowish lakes, white or blue when the water is clear. Some anglers like the contrast of bright colors in dark water and dark colors in light…
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Pros4-1Source's Keith Worrall talks Spring Crappies in the Northwoods. Springtime brings blooms to the Lilacs in the upper Midwest and Trilliums in the far North, and to the northern Crappie angler that means some of the hottest fishing of the year. The Crappies move in to spawn and are concentrated in areas of the lakes or river backwaters for a couple weeks. I headed out a couple days ago to a  couple thousand acre lake in Oneida County, WI I had never fished for pre-spawn Crappies armed with my Humminbird ci SI unit and an Aqua-Vu Micro+DVR pocket sized camera.…
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Live minnows and jigs are far and away the most popular enticements for crappie, and it's a rare occasion when you'll see a died-in-the-wool crappier using a bait or lure other than these. Crappie fishermen, like all sorts of people, are inclined to stick with the tried-and-true. And when it comes to crappie catchers, there's nothing as tried-and-true as jigs and minnows. I'd be the last one to suggest you quit fishing with jigs and minnows. But if you're innovative and experimental, if you like to try new tackle and tactics that produce big slabs, allow me to suggest you try…
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Crappie is one of the most sought after panfish in North America. Who doesn’t love getting into a mess of crappie and just tearing them up? Usually, you know from the second your line hits the water whether or not you’re in them, and when you’re in them, you can practically sit there all day. Whether you’re in it for a trophy slab for the wall or just a big mess to take back home and fry up, there are places around the country that offer some of the best crappie fishing you’ll ever experience Grenada Lake, Mississippi You’ll find Grenada Lake…
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During the spawn the crappie can be taken in shallow water. Crappies spawn on gravel banks in water usually less than five feet. Look for these banks as you cruise the shoreline. Holding the boat just barely within casting distance of the water's edge, cast along the banks with a jig suspended under a small bobber and keep moving. As you do, watch for cover both in and along the shoreline. If you have a sonar, watch it constantly for submerged stumps, logs, brush piles, etc. If you catch a crappie, fish the spot over good before moving. Many docks on…
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Now that the weather’s finally starting to warm up into spring, you can guarantee that the crappie are going to go into a frenzy. Once the water temps hit right around 50 degrees, they’ll move to shallower water and feed until the water gets closer to 60, when they’ll start spawning. Crappie fishing is for kids and adults. Learn Crappie fishing basics at Bass Pro 1Source. Crappie will eat just about any kind of grub you throw at them, but any person who’s fished for crappie knows that different baits will work better for different days. Here are a few things…
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How to Fish for Oxbow Crappie

Wednesday, April 09 2014 6:00 am - for Crappie Fishing
Fast-paced fishing for jumbo crappie, beautiful scenery, a get-away-from-it-all atmosphere — these are some of the characteristics that lure crappie anglers to oxbow lakes along our country's big bottomland rivers. Oxbows are formed by a timeless cycle of eroding floods, meandering channels and resettling earth. Big lowland rivers follow the path of least resistance, eroding the outside shores of their broad bends. In time, some bends become isolated from the main river as it changes course. These bends are called oxbow lakes, because they resemble the U-shaped piece of wood on an ox yoke. Mastering oxbow crappie fishing requires knowledge of…
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Three Cs of Spring Crappie

Sunday, March 30 2014 6:00 am - for Crappie Fishing
Spring's a productive time to angle crappie as these panfish stack-up on predictable spots and are often willing biters. Immediately following ice-out you'll find crappie in and around protected, shallow water. These zones are teeming with forage, and crappie will feed heartily for several weeks until the water's warm enough for spawning, which occurs between late spring and early summer. Cracking the code on early-season crappie relies on the golden rule of real-estate: location, location, location. And when talking papermouths in spring, this means fishing the Three Cs: coves, creeks and canals.   The Action's in the Sheltered, Shallows  …
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